2022 begins with a weave at Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Kingston

EXHIBITION CELEBRATION! 18 MARCH, 7­-9 PM  

This event is free and open to everyone.  

To monitor numbers, we ask you to please register. 

 

Twinned solo exhibitions by two Canadian artists, Chris Curreri and Tom Thomson, entangle stories of authenticity, art history and the artist’s studio. Exposed through the lens of provenance and legacy—whether by historical fact or fictional queering—the artists show us how to work with forms of folded time; similar curatorial questions are being asked from two different time periods, subject positions and styles. 

 

CHRIS CURRERI: A SURROGATE, A PROXY, A STAND-IN 

26 February–29 May 2022 

 

Chris Curreri is a Canadian artist working in photography and sculpture. His work lingers in liminal states, capturing processes as they unfold and focusing in on moments before identity is fixed or concepts come into light as fully intelligible, and thus taken as normative. For Curreri, things in the world are not defined by essential properties or essentializing dichotomies (tenderness/violence, beauty/abjection, self/other); they are constituted through relational exchanges with other things. To what extent do we open ourselves up to, or close ourselves off from, such penetrations? This exhibition performs as an allegory of these issues as if they have emerged between the closure of the aperture and the exposure of the photographic image.  

 

A Surrogate, A Proxy, A Stand-In connects, through the artist’s own history, the experimentation of the dark room to the nighttime freedom of the gay bar. The latter is represented by the solarized photographs of the interior of the defunct Beaver, Toronto’s legendary Queen Street queer bar. Thus, the exhibition places itself on a continuum of intimacy and exchange, of haunting and helping, with Canadian Queer art history—Rodney Werden, General Idea, Will Munro and their contemporary avatars: Luis Jacob, partnering in one of the works, and Curreri himself. 

 

Curated by Emelie Chhangur 

 

Supported by the Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario and the Toronto Arts Council.  

 

 

TOM THOMSON? THE ART OF AUTHENTICATION 

26 February–29 May 2022 

 

Tom Thomson? The Art of Authentication is a kind of laboratory, organized around five themes or areas of investigation: signature, subject matter, style, materials and provenance. Each helps to guide the authentication process, providing clues but not necessarily conclusions. Bringing together forty known Tom Thomson (1877–1917) paintings, along with possible panels and known fakes, the exhibition makes public the behind-the-scenes work of authentication. 

The exhibition is accompanied by the documentary film Finding Authenticity (2021), directed by Tyler Tekatch, and featuring artists Nathan Carson, Chaka Chikodzi, Dorian FitzGerald, Suzy Lake, Deirdre Logue and Allyson Mitchell, Anong Migwans Beam, Shelley Niro and Tim Whiten.  

Curated by Alicia Boutilier and Tobi Bruce 

Tom Thomson? The Art of Authentication is organized and circulated by Agnes and the Art Gallery of Hamilton, in partnership with the Canadian Conservation Institute and supported by the Museums Assistance Program, Government of Canada, and the Janet Braide Memorial Fund, Queen’s University. 
 Over the course of this year, the final in our current facility, we reflect, retreat, rehome and reimagine. Perhaps the hermits in the upcoming exhibition The Dark Room act as a guide? We, too, are in a phase of introspection, looking for answers within.   
THE DARK ROOM 
9 April–10 July 2022 

Portrayed in simple dwellings, cave-like crevices, inhabiting trees and pondering waters, the main protagonists in this exhibition are hermits based on designs by Flemish artist Maerten de Vos (1532-1603). These private worlds are populated by a variety of fantastical creatures that alternatively represent the boundless nature of creation and relentless pull of temptation.  

Acknowledging the powerful potential of mental refuge that is inherent to viewing these prints and with a curious connection to the work of contemporary artist Chris CurreriThe Dark Room proposes a collective re-imagining of these prints to accommodate tangible but unwritten histories, vulnerable affections and shared artistic futurities. 

Curated by Emelie Chhangur and Suzanne van de Meerendonk 

Supported by the Bader Legacy Fund. 

Continuing and Upcoming Exhibitions 

HISTORY IS RARELY BLACK OR WHITE 

To 20 March 2022 

A GUEST + A HOST = A GHOST 

To 8 May 2022 

STUDIES IN SOLITUDE: THE ART OF DEPICTING SECLUSION 

To 26 June 2022 

SANDRA BREWSTER: BLUR 

To 4 December 2022 

SHELBY LISK:  

SHÉ:KON SE’ONHWENTSYÀ:KE RATINÉKERE TSI NIHÁ:TI NÈ:NE YESANORÓNHKHWA  

(THERE ARE STILL PEOPLE IN THE WORLD THAT LOVE YOU) 

5 March–8 May 2022

Agnes Etherington Art Centre 

Situated on traditional Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee Territory, Agnes is a curatorially-driven and research-intensive professional art centre that proudly serves a dual mandate as a leading, internationally recognized public art gallery and as an active pedagogical resource at Queen’s University. By commissioning, researching, collecting and preserving works of art and by exhibiting and interpreting visual culture through an intersectional lens, Agnes creates opportunities for participation and exchange across communities, cultures, histories and geographies. 

Agnes is committed to anti-racism. We work to eradicate institutional biases and develop accountable programs that support and centre the artistic expression and lived experience of Black, Indigenous and People of Colour. Agnes promotes 2SLGBTQIAP+ positive spaces. Admission is free and everyone is welcome. 

36 University Avenue 

Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 

agnes.queensu.ca  

Facebook: @aeartcentre  

Twitter: @aeartcentre  

Instagram: @aeartcentre 

Agnes is an accessible venue, details can be found here

AGNES THANKS Queen’s University, the Canada Council for the Arts, the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario, the City of Kingston Arts Fund, Kingston Arts Council, and through generous contributions by foundations, corporate partners, donors and members.  

Images:  

  1. Chris Curreri, No Tears For The Creatures of The Night, 2021, gelatin silver print. Courtesy of Daniel Faria Gallery 
  2. Tom Thomson, First Snow, 1916, oil on cardboard. Gift of the Queen’s University Art Foundation, 1941 
  3. Left: Unknown Artist after Jan Sadeler I and Raphael Sadeler after Maerten de Vos, Macharius (from: Solitudo Sive Vitae Patrum Eremicolarum, 1585–1586, no. 23), unknown date, engraving on paper. Gift from the estate of Mabel E. Segsworth, through the Queen’s University Art Foundation, 1944. Right: Chris Curreri, The Ventriloquist, 2019, silicone, resin and fabric. Courtesy of Daniel Faria Gallery 

For further information, contact [email protected]

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  • Dinah Jansen
    published this page in News 2022-02-24 09:58:50 -0500